The Animation Anomaly Podcast Episode 5

Originally scheduled for last Sunday but thanks to sound problems, only released today!

In this episode:

00:00 – Tintin and the Copyright Sharks [Mickey Mouse Copyright post link]

07:30 – Top 10 Reasons People Use To Justify Pirating Digital Content (And Why They’re Wrong)

13:30 – The LA Times on Stephen Universe

16:20 – Chernin Group Buying Majority Stake in Crunchyroll, the Anime Subscription Site

Audio file link

The Tintin Opening Titles That Should Have Been

With the impending premiere of the Steven Spielberg/Peter Jackson 3-D, CGI, mo-cap potential flop that is Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn (no. I will not link to it), James Curran has created this alternative title sequence that plays on minimalism (by using the shape of a circle) but still manages to get in a reference for each one of the 24 original books in under a minute and a half.

If The Poster is Overwrought, What Chance Does the Film Have?

 Via: Movie Fanatic

It doesn’t so much say adventure as it screams “THIS IS GOING TO BE A BIG BIG MOVIE THAT YOU SHOULD DEFINITELY SEE BECAUSE IT’S SET ALL AROUND THE WORLD AND WE’VE USED PHOTOSHOP FOR THIS POSTER TO PROVE HOW AWESOME IT IS”

Apologies for the screaming.

While I’m aware that this is more of a teaser poster than anything else, it does seem to be beating its breast a bit. This doesn’t concern me so much as why it’s doing so this early in the game. Most teaser posters are much more sublime and only really hint at what the audience can expect. This goes full bore and leaves relatively little to the imagination.

It’s slightly disconcerting to know that the studio feels the need to put this much information on a poster that should show a lot less (yes, the earlier ones did show a lot less, I’m aware of that). It’s a sure sign that a film is overwrought/overproduced if ever there was one.

The creepy looking characters don’t help matters either.

For putting you through that, here’s the teaser poster for Luc Besson’s upcoming feature A Monster in Paris. Much nicer don’t you think?

Via: Shockya.com

Thoughts on the Tintin Movie

Via: Cartoon Brew

By now we’ve all seen the stills on Empire and read the comments on Cartoon Brew. I myself would have posted a lot earlier but the old PC is acting up (my motherboard is suffering from capacitor fatigue) and it got to the point this morning that I was halfway done writing this post before it shut off by itself.

But enough of my computer woes and onto some animation ones. The upcoming Tintin feature will be made in motion-capture, that much is certain. Now I am no fan of the technology. If something is considered animated, that means there are no humans involved in the actual movement process. When I say this, I do not mean to include rotoscoping. That process still relies on a degree of talent to draw the character. Motion-capture removes the vast majority of that skill and relies instead on a designer and set-builder.

Much of the hubbub around the film concerns the look of the characters and how much they differ from the comics. It’s nearly impossible to pass judgement on a film based off two still pictures, so a more complete opinion will have to wait until we see some actual footage.

It’s sadly becoming harder and harder to convince people that traditional animation is often much more appropriate for certain projects. Tintin is a prime example. The Nelvana TV series was very much true to the comics and was all the better for it. This film is likely to see a much greater departure from the books fans the world over know and love (myself included).

The final aspect to consider is what the overall plan is for the film. There were 21 Tintin books in total and unless the producers expect to make a James Bond-esque series, there are going to be some tough choices to be made.

The release date is still some time away so I will not be worrying about it too much until then and neither should you.